Three nifty ways with neutrals
The only three true neutrals are white, black and the in-between of grey. But there are also accepted neutrals – or naturals –the broken whites, creams, beiges, taupes and soft browns of stone, un-dyed linen or wool. How do you make neutrals work in the home? Here are our three ways:

Just neutrals
Neutral colours on their own create a harmonious scheme. A basic rule of interior design is to consider the practical alongside the aesthetic. It would be impractical, for example, to decorate a hallway in pale cream with an off white carpet – too hard in real life! Also, black and white, especially when used together to form a pattern, is the most stimulating- and disturbing - of neutral combinations. This combination should be 
carefully planned and considered before being introduced to a room.



Neutrals and texture
If using neutral colours on their own in a room scheme, a good mixture of contrasting textures – smooth, rough, hard, soft shiny and matt is important for providing visual interest and stimulation. Untreated wood, bamboo, rattan, wicker, bare brick, rough plaster, natural floor coverings unglazed terracotta, paper lampshades, un-dyed muslin and faux fur are great textural possibilities in neutral colour schemes. 

Neutrals in a mixed scheme
Neutrals can be livened up with contrasting accents. The basic rule is to relate these accents to the overall style of the room. Also, choose warm or cool colours according to the atmosphere you want to create. Simply adding bright red to your all white room by way of a red cushion, red bowl, vase of red flowers and a picture of a red rose on the wall will fail to create a scheme. But with a predominantly neutral scheme, you could use several different accent colours, mixing cool and warm, or different tonal vales of one or two colours.




















The only three true neutrals are white, black and
the in-between of grey. But there are also accepted neutrals – or naturals –
the broken whites, creams, beiges, taupes and soft browns of stone, un-dyed
linen or wool. How do you make neutrals work in the home? Here are our three
ways:

 

Just neutrals

Neutral colours on their own create a harmonious
scheme. A basic rule of interior design is to consider the practical alongside
the aesthetic. It would be impractical, for example, to decorate a hallway in
pale cream with an off white carpet – too hard in real life! Also, black and
white, especially when used together to form a pattern, is the most stimulating
- and disturbing - of neutral combinations. This combination should be
carefully planned and considered before being introduced to a room.

 

Neutrals and texture

If using neutral colours on their own in a room
scheme, a good mixture of contrasting textures – smooth, rough, hard, soft
shiny and matt is important for providing visual interest and stimulation.
Untreated wood, bamboo, rattan, wicker, bare brick, rough plaster, natural
floor coverings unglazed terracotta, paper lampshades, un-dyed muslin and faux
fur are great textural possibilities in neutral colour schemes.

 

Neutrals In a mixed
scheme

Neutrals can be livened up with contrasting
accents. The basic rule is to relate these accents to the overall style of the
room. Also, choose warm or cool colours according to the atmosphere you want to
create. Simply adding bright red to your all white room by way of a red
cushion, red bowl, vase of red flowers and a picture of a red rose on the wall
will fail to create a scheme. But with a predominantly neutral scheme, you
could use several different accent colours, mixing cool and warm, or different
tonal vales of one or two colours.




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